muse9

- Association art & science - Geneve (CH)

rhamphotheca:

Humpback Whale Shows AMAZING Appreciation After Being Freed From Nets

Michael Fishbach, co-founder of The Great Whale Conservancy (GWC), narrates his encounter with a young humpback whale entangled in local fishing nets.

At first, the animal appeared to be dead, yet Fishbach investigated and quickly discovered that the poor creature was tangled in a fishing net.

The humans had to act fast; what began as a tragedy soon became a thrilling rescue as Fishbach and his crew labored to free the young whale.

The entire encounter was caught on videotape and later narrated by Fishbach himself…

(read more: WakeUpWorld)

rhamphotheca:

creepycrawlieslove: Moss-mimicking Walking Stick (Trychopeplus laciniatus)

Family Phasmidae. Found in Amazon basin rainforest, somewhat near Cali, southern Colombia, South America. (top specimen is a young female.)

(via: the Featured Creature)                 (photos: Robert Oelman)

rhamphotheca:

What is a Quasar? 
by  Life’s Little Mysteries staff
The word “quasar” refers to a “quasi-stellar radio source.” The first quasars were discovered in the 1960s when astronomers measured their very strong radio emissions. Later, scientists discovered that quasars are actually radio-quiet, with very little radio emission. However, quasars are some of the brightest and most distant objects we can see.
These ultra-bright objects are likely the centers of active galaxies where supermassive black holes reside. As material spirals into the black holes, a large part of the mass is converted to energy. It is this energy that we see. And though smaller than our solar system, a single quasar can outshine an entire galaxy of a hundred billion stars.
To date, astronomers have identified more than a thousand quasars.
(via: Life’s Little Mysteries)            (image: ESO/M. Kornmesser)

rhamphotheca:

What is a Quasar?

by  Life’s Little Mysteries staff

The word “quasar” refers to a “quasi-stellar radio source.” The first quasars were discovered in the 1960s when astronomers measured their very strong radio emissions. Later, scientists discovered that quasars are actually radio-quiet, with very little radio emission. However, quasars are some of the brightest and most distant objects we can see.

These ultra-bright objects are likely the centers of active galaxies where supermassive black holes reside. As material spirals into the black holes, a large part of the mass is converted to energy. It is this energy that we see. And though smaller than our solar system, a single quasar can outshine an entire galaxy of a hundred billion stars.

To date, astronomers have identified more than a thousand quasars.

(via: Life’s Little Mysteries)            (image: ESO/M. Kornmesser)

sciencecenter:

The only thing cooler than this female spiny orb spider, Gasteracantha arcuata, is her male counterpart below. That’s right, the two spiders are from the same species, and represent an extreme case of sexual dimorphism. (from South and Southeast Asia)

(photos by Melvyn Yeo)

(via rhamphotheca)

sinobug:

Lychee Shield Bug (Chrysocoris stolii), family Scutelleridae

Scutelleridae is a family of true bugs. They are commonly known as jewel bugs or metallic shield bugs due to their often brilliant coloration. They are also known as shield-backed bugs due to the enlargement of the last section of their thorax into a continuous shield over the abdomen and wings. This latter characteristic distinguishes them from most other Hemipteran bug families, and may lead to misidentification as a beetle rather than a bug. These insects feed on plant juices from a variety of different species, including some commercial crops. Closely related to stink bugs, they may also produce an offensive odour when disturbed.

Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese true bugs and hoppers on my Flickr site HERE…..

(via rhamphotheca)

rhamphotheca:

Are Animals Moral Beings?
by Tia Ghose
Does Mr. Whiskers really love you or is he just angling for treats?
Until recently, scientists would have said your cat was snuggling up to you only as a means to get tasty treats. But many animals have a moral compass, and feel emotions such as love, grief, outrage and empathy, a new book argues.
The book, “Can Animals Be Moral?” (Oxford University Press, October 2012), suggests social mammals such as rats, dogs and chimpanzees can choose to be good or bad. And because they have morality, we have moral obligations to them, said author Mark Rowlands, a University of Miami philosopher…
(read more: Live Science)                             (photo: Jinterwas | Flickr)

rhamphotheca:

Are Animals Moral Beings?

by Tia Ghose

Does Mr. Whiskers really love you or is he just angling for treats?

Until recently, scientists would have said your cat was snuggling up to you only as a means to get tasty treats. But many animals have a moral compass, and feel emotions such as love, grief, outrage and empathy, a new book argues.

The book, “Can Animals Be Moral?” (Oxford University Press, October 2012), suggests social mammals such as rats, dogs and chimpanzees can choose to be good or bad. And because they have morality, we have moral obligations to them, said author Mark Rowlands, a University of Miami philosopher…

(read more: Live Science)                             (photo: Jinterwas | Flickr)

iseegodinbirds:

earth-song:

The escuerzoBudgett’s Frog or wide-mouth frog (Lepidobatrachus laevis) is a species of frog in the Leptodactylidae family. It is found in ArgentinaBolivia, and Paraguay. Its natural habitats are dry savanna, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, intermittent freshwater marshes, pastureland, and ponds. It is threatened by habitat loss. by wiki

How is this tiny friend so adorable?!

(via rhamphotheca)

rhamphotheca:

A pair of Humans (Homo s. sapiens) help Black Bear cubs (Ursus americanus) escape from a dumpster. Despite their reputation, humans are capable of great altruism at times.

(via: The Happy Herbivore)

rhamphotheca:

The endangered Golden Langur (Trachypithecus geei) has been declared an endangered species. I found these langurs on the island of Umananda, in the Brahmaputra river next to the bustling city of Guwahati, Assam, India. Their striking color and long tails make them quite attractive, and visitors to the island’s temple are happy to indulge them with biscuits and cake.
(text/photo: Doniv79 | Wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:

The endangered Golden Langur (Trachypithecus geei) has been declared an endangered species. I found these langurs on the island of Umananda, in the Brahmaputra river next to the bustling city of Guwahati, Assam, India. Their striking color and long tails make them quite attractive, and visitors to the island’s temple are happy to indulge them with biscuits and cake.

(text/photo: Doniv79 | Wikipedia)

rhamphotheca:


Hope Delayed for Sharks in Atlantic
by Erik Stokstad
Conservationists failed to win new protections for threatened sharks in the Atlantic Ocean at the annual meeting of a major international fisheries commission, but they hope to make significant progress over the next few years. That’s because for the first time, the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, which concluded its annual meeting today in Agadir, Morocco, has agreed to open its treaty for new changes, including to shark management. “This is unprecedented,” says Elizabeth Wilson of the Pew Environment Group, an environmental advocacy organization based in Washington, D.C.
ICCAT, which was established in 1966, manages some 30 species, including swordfish, marlin, and other tunalike species. But the commission does not set catch limits for sharks. Most kinds of sharks are caught accidentally by vessels hunting for tuna and tunalike species, although a few species, such as shortfin makos, are targeted directly for their meat and large fins…
(read more: Science NOW)              
(image: Porbeagle Shark, by Doug Perrinne, SeaPics)

rhamphotheca:

Hope Delayed for Sharks in Atlantic

by Erik Stokstad

Conservationists failed to win new protections for threatened sharks in the Atlantic Ocean at the annual meeting of a major international fisheries commission, but they hope to make significant progress over the next few years. That’s because for the first time, the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, which concluded its annual meeting today in Agadir, Morocco, has agreed to open its treaty for new changes, including to shark management. “This is unprecedented,” says Elizabeth Wilson of the Pew Environment Group, an environmental advocacy organization based in Washington, D.C.

ICCAT, which was established in 1966, manages some 30 species, including swordfish, marlin, and other tunalike species. But the commission does not set catch limits for sharks. Most kinds of sharks are caught accidentally by vessels hunting for tuna and tunalike species, although a few species, such as shortfin makos, are targeted directly for their meat and large fins…

(read more: Science NOW)              

(image: Porbeagle Shark, by Doug Perrinne, SeaPics)